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The Arts (Drama)

Students experiment with character and explore the ‘bystander effect’ to manage peer pressure and unsafe behaviours of other young people on the rail network. Choose suitable activities from 3 differentiated lessons.

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  • Teacher notes
  • Teacher notes

      Read the teacher notes first for instructions and suggested learning pathways. You can then choose to teach all 3 lessons or select a couple of activities which suit your students best.

  • Lesson plan
  • Lesson 1: Peer pressure, bullying and the ‘bystander effect’: bringing in ideas

      Students use hexagons to brainstorm everything they know about peer pressure, bullying, and the ‘bystander effect’. They complete a reflection grid about a situation where they have acted in a certain way because of bullying, peer pressure or being a bystander. They create a storyline for a bystander effect scenario and experiment with character techniques. They share these techniques using Hot Seating or Freeze Framing.

    • Resource

      HookED Hexagon Template

  • Lesson plan
  • Lesson 2: Peer pressure, bullying and the ‘bystander effect’: connecting ideas

      Students tease out compelling stories from Lesson 1, conduct research and create a 60 second drama about bullying and the ‘bystander effect’. They make decisions about the nature of the crisis, and how the crisis is resolved. They then use an Augusto Boal Forum Theatre Freeze Frame technique to investigate the decisions made and how the actors are feeling. They use the See Think Wonder strategy to further refine the script and perform for their peers.

    • Resource

      HookED Describe ++ Map

  • Lesson plan
  • Lesson 3: Peer pressure, bullying and the ‘bystander effect’: extending ideas

      Students rework their 60-second ‘bystander effect drama into a drama to explore ways of managing peer pressure on the rail network. They experiment with their adaptation by adding mimed action, soundscape, narration and convention to build tension, belief and audience engagement. Their drama prompts the audience to think, “To what extent are we personally responsible for what we see happening around us?”